Dry aging a Loin of Beef : Part 1


Dry aging beef is a great way to turn a great steak into a amazing one! 

 


I will be taking a loin of beef that was on sale and dry aging it for 28 days.   

   

So, what’s the big deal about dry aging beef? 

     

   Dry aging is a process that is used to tenderise and enhance a meats flavor. It is a process that requires time, refrigeration and space. Beef that has been dry aged is expensive because aging takes a lot of time.  This is the reason it cost so much for a dry aged steak in a restaurant. It’s like a fine wine and a whisky with age on it , the longer it ages, the more desirable it comes.  Prime cuts are what’s normally used to be dry age. As I mentioned a dry age steak is expensive, a cut of dry aged beef in a restaurant will cost around a $100 a steak. 

What does the process consist of?

   Dry aging starts by selecting a cut of beef. A Rib, Shell, or Porterhouse are commonly used. Most people will tell you to use a prime cut. I feel a good Angus cut of beef will work just as good. Make sure there is good marbling and a nice color to your piece.

You want to dry it of with paper towel and put it in a pan with a metal rack. I used a plastic container cover to rest the meat on and used a plate as the base.

The outer part of the beef will get black and leathery, while the inside will lose moisture and the enzymes will break the meat down. This is what makes it tender. The dried out outer part will keep mold from growing inside the meat.

How did I picked out the meat I am using. 

The cut I am using is a Loin cut of beef. I used the side closest to the rib. This is a great cut that has a lot of flavor. I used a Angus cut of beef. It’s about 5 inches long and weighs about 5 pounds (keep your jokes to yourself). By the time I reach 28 days, my piece should shrink to 34 pounds. That’s enough for about 4 steaks. In the photo above is a good cut of meat that you use as a reference. It has great color and marbling.  

To learn how to pick out a shell steak click here

 

When the meat is finished drying I will have to trim off all of the outer dried out parts to get the editable center. I originally thought this would be 3 parts but I cut it down to 2 blogs. In part 2, I will go over how to trim it.

I used :

2 container caps

1 plate as a base.

If your’re nervous about doing this in your refrigerator, try this kit by UMAi Dry. They have a nice little kit that is highly recommended and is easy to use. click here

(Above) A loin cut of beef that has been only aging for a couple of days.

Stay tuned for the second part of this article coming at the end of this month!

If you enjoyed this please like and share.

Thanks again,

The Hamptons butcher 

Author: kfm

Hello, and welcome.

I am the Hamptons butcher and have been a butcher fr 20 years. I traveled a lot and studied different cuts of meat from around the world. I enjoy what i do, but i enjoy even the art behind what i do.

1 thought on “Dry aging a Loin of Beef : Part 1”

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